Blog Posts on Wendell Berry, “People, Land, and Community”

Advertisements

16 thoughts on “Blog Posts on Wendell Berry, “People, Land, and Community”

  1. The main idea about “People, Land, and Community” was about Berry’s idea of “pattern of living things.” This phrase is about our relationship with nature, we are all connected in a cycle (life->death->renewal->)
    Berry explains how we need to allow nature to be our teacher, we should not try to control nature for it is more knowledgeable than us. Nature does not exceed its limits and does not produce waste like us humans do. We should learn from nature and become more knowledgeable about our land. We need to unite with nature and live in harmony. We are all connected and interdependent of each other. Berry believes that we have too many farmers, and argues that if we decrease the amount of farmers we can begin to become more knowledgeable. For if there are more farmers it is more local aspect and less corporate therefore people will learn about the land and have a more caring relationship. He states that the Amish lifestyle is one we should strive for, since the Amish people are self-sufficient and live in harmony with the land.

    Like

    • 2 points (second post of the week). Berry’s “pattern of living things” is really his most important, most fundamental idea in his philosophy–important to understand. When you say “Berry believes that we have too many farmers,” the opposite is actually true–he believes we don’t have enough farmers.

      Like

  2. Wendell Berry’s idea about the “pattern of living things” is utopian, because nature is utopian. Everything works the way it is supposed to work, and the best part of it is that it’s a sustainable cycle, aways renewing itself. However, what caught my attention was a paragraph where Berry is saying that we are all ignorants, and that the world is greater than our knowledge of it. He brings up two question about knowledge: “having the ability and desire to know, how and what should we learn? And, having learned, how and for what should we use what we know?”
    This two questions made me think a lot about how much society and capitalism influences our choices. Kids may not study a subject they love just because society tells them they won’t make enough money out of it. What is even worse, is that kids may choose a profession just because they think they’ll make a lot of money. One example is my uncle. He was studying Geography and on his third year had to switch to Law because he was told he couldn’t make a living out of it. At the end, he got a law degree and a geology one.
    I believe that kids should be taught since an early age that they should study and work with what they love, that money is consequence of good work, and to do whatever they’re doing with responsibility and care for nature and the environment.

    Like

  3. Wendell Berry stresses the need for natural harmony. I think that in “People, Land, and Community” he is very blunt stating that we need to start caring about our environment and conservation or else we will suffer from self-annihilation. Most of this chapter is just of Wendell talking about the correlation between people who care about the land have a more intimate knowledge of nature, and people who see the land as economical value will only care for it because they have to, and that people need to be the first one. He talks about the pattern of living things, which is another way to say “the circle of life” which means that we all depend on each other. He uses this as a reason why people need to care about the environment, when we die we need to leave the land in good condition for not just our children but the animals and other living things. He brings up an example of a tractor being destructive towards the land but later concludes that technology is fine in moderation.

    Like

    • 5 points. Berry’s “circle of life” or “pattern of nature” is really his most important idea in his thinking and writing. His idea of who will care for the natural world aligns well with Sanders!

      Like

  4. Wendell Berry’s “People, Land and Community” was a very interesting read for me. In it he states that we as a human race needs to take care of our land and environment much better or else we end to exist. This piece relates to what we have been learning about in this course about the eco-system and how it is a never ending circle in which we need to depend of the other elements of the equation, or interdependence. Berry brings up a lot that we are not very knowledgeable of the planet, but we think we are. We think we know how everything works, and that will bite us in the butt later. The earth has been around for millions of years, experiencing every type of disaster thinkable. He explains how the amish are very knowledgable on keeping the relationship between them and the environment. By keeping that, they can build a trust and will last a long time. Schools need to take an extra step and teach all the kids the importance of keeping a healthy land and how we will survive much longer with that.

    Like

    • 5 points. Berry’s point about our knowledge (and ignorance) of the natural world and our attitude toward that knowledge is one of the most difficult ideas for a lot of people to accept or even wrap their minds around. You seem not to have had that trouble, though!

      Like

  5. Wendell Berry’s piece “People, Land, and Community” refers to the interdependence of humans and nature. The author talks about how people must take care of their land to continue the circle of life we are moving in. Berry also mentions a “pattern of living things”, meaning there is no true waste. He states, “For the farm built into the pattern of living things, as an analogue of forest or prairie, time is a bringer of gifts”. This statement is in comparison to Wendell Berry’s statement about using machines. He says, “They shorten our work, in a sense popularly approved, by simplifying it and speeding it up, but our work perishes quickly in them too as they wear out and are discarded”. Time will eventually run out while doing work using machines as they will eventually break down and have to be thrown away, creating waste. However, living things are efficient and will never create waste through recycling, renewal, and adaptation. To achieve this circle of life, Berry believes it must be earned by treating the earth and all of it’s elements right.

    Like

  6. At the beginning of the reading he talks about the connections that join people, land, and the community and what aspects exactly connect them. He says that people see the characteristic of “knowledge” as the best thing someone could acquire. He says the quote, “the future can be studied and planned for; that limited supplies can be wasted without harm; that good intentions can safeguard the use of nuclear power”. Basically he is saying that humans are selfish with their resources, and think they are smart enough to know the consequences of every action they might do, when in reality they do not. Later in the reading he goes onto connecting the relationship between a man and woman in a marriage to that of a relationship between a person and the land. He says they are nearly the same in the sense that they both connect us to time in the same way. He also says that our love for the land should be equivalent to love in a marriage. He also says how once people are connected to the land, they try to make it their own. For example, the earth is in no hurry which seems to be the exact opposite of people in the world today. Everyday people are looking for new ways to develop and further the achievements of establishments. Which connects to his quote “ It does not see what is already there; it never sees the forest that precedes the farm or the farm that precedes the shopping center”. Its connection is to the people and their need for development.

    Like

  7. In Wendell Berry’s “People, Land, and Community,” Berry really stresses the idea of finding harmony within a community. He ties his ideas of marriage to his ideas of developing a relationship with the land. I really enjoyed reading his comparisons between the two because they helped me understand what he meant by building a strong, long lasting relationship between the landowner and the land, from the agricultural standpoint. He also emphasizes the idea of the pattern of living things through referencing the way that the Amish people live their life and the way they treat the land. Instead of using machinery and electronics like the way the majority of farmers do now, they stick with the basics by using real horses, they way the land is meant to be farmed. He also stresses the idea of needing a sense of community, “For it to do this, in addition to preceding requirements, we must have community. Without community, the good work of a single farmer or a single family will not mean much or last long.” This point really made sense to me because no matter how hard we work or how successful we think we might be, without working together as a community, we are nothing.

    Like

  8. Wendall Barry talks about his ideas of creating harmony in a community. His ideas are akin to that of individual branches breaking but collectively it is unbreakable. Wendall says how individually a person can only achieve so much but when people come together, anything is possible.Wendall talks about how the connection a person has to the earth shall resemble a marriage. This means that one should treat the earth with as much respect as they would treat a marriage. The earth is in no rush to do anything but evidently humans are. This rush leads to a great misuse of resources and land. He mentions that the Amish people are a prime example of a society that can operate alongside the earth instead of working the earth. The Amish use manual labor instead of waste-producing machines. They ride horses (earth’s creatures) rather than automobiles. The Amish are able to sustain a peaceful relationship with the earth so why can’t the rest of the world?

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s